How to prepare your website for HTTP/2

There's definitely a new wind blowing on the web as of late. We've been operating within a fairly complacent status quo after HTTP/1.1 was formalized way back in 1997. After nearly 20 years a number of factors in the world at large apparently made some much-needed improvements to the web reach critical mass. These improvements center around a modernized HTTP-protocol and the push towards universal implementation of TLS encryption, helped immensely by the fact that Microsoft finally also supports SNI.

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The Fappening: the web's growing pains

So I guess it finally happened on the first of September 2014: the public at large notices that the internet is essentially a hostile place. All it took, apparently, was the right set of famous boobies at the right time. Now while the talking heads on TV are playing the blame game, let me give you my view on The Fappening, as it's being called on the grungier parts of the web.

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Why I download

I'm not entirely in favor of unbridled downloading of whatever you want, but the protection of content under the law has also gone way overboard. There's been an imbalance there for decades, which finally broke the surface when ordinary citizens started downloading protected works in droves. Repression of this symptom is not the way to deal with the underlying problem.

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Who actually benefits from banner retargeting?

Commercial practice on the internet works according to something that looks like a universal law. It boils down to: make the purchasing process as effortless as possible. Or, to phrase it differently: people aren't very good decision makers so make as many decisions as possible for them in advance. The first commandment to any online consumer would seem to be: thou shalt not think.

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Secanje.nl just went live

Screenshot of Secanje.nl

As an example of projects I like to do in my free time, the website Opens external link in new windowSecanje.nl just went live. A group of friends went out and researched the fate of a considerable number of Serbian soldiers who died in the aftermath of WWI in the early 20th century. A small number of monuments sprinkled across a handful of Dutch cemeteries commemorates their sacrifice. Starting today their memory has a place on the world wide web as well, which I'm proud to host.

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